Blues vs Bruins

Blues vs Bruins : Boston Bruins vs. St. Louis Blues: Live stream, start time, TV channel , It’s been almost two weeks since the Boston Bruins last played a hockey game and six days since the St. Louis Blues did. There’s been lots of rust talk in the mean time. Both teams were rolling when the won their conference finals. Are they still hot?

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Boston Bruins (A2) vs. St. Louis Blues (C3)

Monday, May 27, 8 p.m.: Blues @ Bruins | NBC, SN, CBC, TVA Sports
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In this Feb. 23, 2019, file photo, Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask (40), of Finland, makes a save against St. Louis Blues’ Patrick Maroon (7) during the second period of an NHL hockey game, in St. Louis. The Bruins and Blues will meet in the Stanley Cup Final, a rematch of the 1970 series that ended with Bobby Orr’s famous goal and leaping celebration. Boston has been in the final three times in the past nine seasons, but this is St. Louis’ first trip in 49 years. (AP Photo/Dilip Vishwanat, File)

In this Feb. 23, 2019, file photo, Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask (40), of Finland, makes a save against St. Louis Blues’ Patrick Maroon (7) during the second period of an NHL hockey game, in St. Louis. The Bruins and Blues will meet in the Stanley Cup Final, a rematch of the 1970 series that ended with Bobby Orr’s famous goal and leaping celebration. Boston has been in the final three times in the past nine seasons, but this is St. Louis’ first trip in 49 years.

It’s been almost two weeks since the Boston Bruins last played a hockey game and six days since the St. Louis Blues did. There’s been lots of rust talk in the mean time. Both teams were rolling when the won their conference finals. Are they still hot?

When the NHL altered its rules with an eye toward speed and skill, this is not the Stanley Cup Final it had in mind.

Hockey is becoming less of a big man’s game, offense is up and it’s faster than ever. Then there’s the big and tough St. Louis Blues facing off against the bigger and tougher Boston Bruins in the final that shows size still matters in the playoffs.

“They are physical, we’ll be physical,” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said Sunday. “I don’t think we shy away from that type of game.”

The past decade-plus has been a study in the NHL getting younger and quicker, and previous champions like Chicago in 2013 and 2015 and Pittsburgh in 2016 and 2017 exemplified that. The 2019 champion will show there are still many kinds of blueprints for winning, though skill is still needed along with size and physicality.

When the puck drops on Game 1 Monday night, the bruises will begin in what should be a throwback series with the Stanley Cup on the line.

Blues vs Bruins Live Stanley Cup Finals 2019 game Free In HD

“At this point you’re going to get both teams coming out of the gates laying their hits,” big Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo said. “It’s going to be a heavy series. It’s hard to say how much physicality will be going both ways. I’m sure guys will be looking to get their licks in.”

Boston and St. Louis don’t lack high-end skill, from goaltenders Tuukka Rask and Jordan Binnington to scorers Brad Marchand and Vladimir Tarasenko. They do resemble their coaches — Cassidy, who has become a mature, straightforward communicator and Craig Berube, a no-nonsense, team-first guy who has turned the Blues into a north-south, no frills team.

These teams are in many ways mirror images of each other based on their gritty styles and how tough they are to crack.

“The two hardest, heaviest teams are in the final,” San Jose Sharks coach Peter DeBoer said after his team was eliminated by the Blues in the Western Conference final. “Everybody talks about skill and speed, there’s room for all these small players. There is a room for that. But I don’t think it’s an accident.”

It’s certainly no accident that the Bruins and Blues like to make opponents black and blue. Bruins forward Danton Heinen said physicality is what he and his teammates have tried to deliver all year long and will continue to, but the Blues figured out last round that they need to be more selective about dishing out punishment.

“You can’t just run around out there,” St. Louis forward Oskar Sundqvist said. “When you’re going to hit, you need to hit with a purpose.”

The purpose now is to lift hockey’s hallowed trophy. After Bruins center Patrice Bergeron played the 2013 final with broken ribs and a punctured lung, there’s not much guys won’t do this time of year at their own expense.

“This is the Stanley Cup. This is what everyone plays for,” Boston forward Jake DeBrusk said. “It’s going to be fun, physical and pretty intense, so hopefully the body holds up for everybody here.”

GOALIE DUEL

With a league-best 1.42 goals-against average and .942 save percentage, Rask is the front-runner to win the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. Rask is in his second final as a starter after being on the Boston team that lost to Chicago in six games in 2015.

“It’s a team sport,” Rask said. “Everybody has to pull their load. That’s the only way you can win.”

All the Blues is win, win, win no matter what since Binnington made his first NHL start in early January. They won 30 of their final 45 games to get into the playoffs, and Binnington has a 2.36 GAA and .914 save percentage in the playoffs.

No goalie has won the Conn Smythe since Jonathan Quick with Los Angeles in 2012.

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